Piping Vibration Physical Mechanisms

The root cause for piping vibration can be one or many of the following: Mechanically-induced vibration Fluctuating Line Pressure (LP) Flow-induced by variations in Kinetic Pressure (KP) Pulsation-driven, i.e. excited by propagating waves in the pipe system Figure 1. Pressure, Line Pressure, Pulsation and %LP. %LP matters for the generation of shock waves from wave steepening, a topic treated elsewhere in this Learn More section. (Click on figure to expand) Mechanically-induced vibration tends to be the largest near a machine or perhaps, externally-induced vibration transmitted e.g. via a...

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Vibration Isolation

Vibration isolation often is assumed to be a component property, i.e. something exclusively related to the isolating spring component or the resonance frequency of the mass-spring system (see Figure 1). The component property assumption is of importance as it affects how we act and think when dealing with vibration isolation. Believing that vibration isolation simply is an item to purchase can mislead your engineering process as you overlook a number of things that affect the end result. Note – We assume that the reader understands the sdof system shown in Figure 1. If not, read this...

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Site Survey

Science buildings often are high-risk projects because: The end customer does not often order a new science building. The building contractor team usually only gets to build a specific kind of science building once. The consultant usually has limited knowledge about what is required for scientific machines to work well and may not have participated in this type of project before. As the usefulness of the science building stands or falls with its performance, our advice is to use a risk based project management philosophy when constructing science buildings. Scientific machines usually have...

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